Planned Parenthood Global- Youth Peer Providers

Posted in Documentary | Photography, Ecuador, Ethiopia, Peru, teenage pregnancy, Uncategorized, womens reproductive healthcare on July 8th, 2012 by tuschman

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Last year, I had created a library of images for Planned Parenthood Global, which works in rural and urban areas of Guatemala, Nicaragua, Ecuador, Peru, Ethiopia, and Kenya. In all of these countries, rates of unintended pregnancy and unsafe abortions remain very high.

This post describes how Planned Parenthood has used a very innovative “Youth Peer Provider” model. This program trains young teenagers to teach and empower their peers with the knowledge that they need to prevent unwanted pregnancies and sexually transmitted diseases. These young people assume the role of health educators and contraceptive counselors. In countries where talking to young people about sex remains taboo, Youth Peer Providers help their counterparts to delay pregnancy, stay healthy, and stay in school.

The images of teenagers earnestly educating their peers, with explicit demonstrations of the proper use of condoms, are scenes that one does not normally see here in the US. Using peer counselors to educate their fellow adolescents has proven very effective in reducing rates of unintended pregnancy, and empowering teenagers to control their lives and pursue their dreams.

Below, Ofelia is a peer counselor who has been trained  by Planned Parenthood. She is pictured outside her parents guesthouse in Cusco, Peru. She is explaining the proper use of condoms to a high-school student who lives in a rural area and boards at the guesthouse.

Planned Parenthood peer counselors distributing condoms and safe-sex information to young men and sexually active teenagers in a plaza in Jinotega Nicaragua

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Dowry Abuse in India- Action India Women’s Support Group

Posted in Global Health, India, Non Profit, Recent Projects, Uncategorized, womens reproductive healthcare on March 15th, 2012 by tuschman

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This January, I documented the work of Action India, a grantee of the Global Fund for Women. Action India is involved in many aspects of women’s empowerment; one aspect of their work in particular, however, moved me the most: supporting women who have been victims of dowry abuse.

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Planned Parenthood Global and Soccer in Kenya

Posted in Africa, Documentary | Photography, Girls Education, Global Health, Kenya, Non Profit, Recent Projects, Uncategorized, womens reproductive healthcare on February 22nd, 2012 by tuschman

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(The following text has several contributors- primarily Joyce Ho, a Graduate Media Fellow from the Stanford School of Medicine and Leila Darabi from Planned Parenthood Global).

In Kenya, Planned Parenthood Global (PP Global) works with several local soccer leagues to integrate sexual and reproductive health education and services into their programs.

For many, expectations for their educational and career success do not extend beyond completing primary school. Some are already mothers. Joining an athletic league provides these young women with the chance to exercise, become part of a team, and have some fun. Evidence shows that young women who participate in team sports are more confident, stay in school longer, and set more ambitious career goals than those who never get to run across a field or score a goal.

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Kibera

Posted in Africa, Documentary | Photography, Global Health, Kenya, Kibera, poverty, Uncategorized on January 24th, 2012 by tuschman

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This past year I had two opportunities to photograph in Kibera, Kenya, which is the second largest slum in Africa and the third largest in the world. Even though I have witnessed poverty, the physical landscape of Kibera was, to put it frankly, quite overwhelming.

The population of Kibera is estimated at 1.1 million people, up from 700,000 ten years ago. There is no infrastructure, no roads, no safe drinking water, or sewers. Kibera is created from scraps of tin and mud. The photographs presented here were all taken on my way to do work assignments in the AMREF Clinic (for the Novartis Malaria Initiative) and in the Tabitha clinic (for Planned Parenthood). All of the photos are “grab” shots. Some were taken from the vehicle that we used to get to the AMREF clinic. The car I was in had to inch it’s way along narrow muddy streets barely wide enough for our vehicle. Outside my window, people were going about their daily life not more than three feet away.

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7 Billion Unique Stories

Posted in Documentary | Photography, education, News, Non Profit, Recent Projects, Uncategorized, womens reproductive healthcare on July 15th, 2011 by tuschman

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A new report from the UN comes just ahead of a demographic milestone: the world’s population is expected to pass 7 billion in late October, only a dozen years after it surpassed 6 billion. The UNFPA (United Nations Population Fund) is about to release a new campaign urging each individual and organization to take creative action to solve the immense problems we face as global interconnected community. To quote from the brochure, “every day one billion of us go hungry, two billion of us are surviving on less than $1 a day, one billion of us don’t have access to clean water and more than one thousand women die in pregnancy or during childbirth each day.”

“In a world that is more interconnected than ever before, challenges such as poverty, inequality, women’s rights, aging and the environment belong to all of us.”

“These are problems that can, and must be solved. Thankfully, significant strides are being made by committed organizations and impassioned individuals all over the world. Working together, incremental actions will create exponential results.”

I am very proud that many of my images are being used to highlight this call to action. Below are ten posters featuring the campaign. Other photographs will also be used in a National Geographic insert, a multi-media web presentation and an exhibit in Copenhagen.

For those not familiar with UNFPA, the “United Nations Population Fund is an international development agency that promotes the right of every woman, man and child to enjoy a life of health and equal opportunity. UNFPA supports countries in using population data for policies and programmes to reduce poverty and to ensure that every pregnancy is wanted, every birth is safe, every young person is free of HIV/AIDS, and every girl and woman is treated with dignity and respect. UNFPA – because everyone counts.”

 

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Nigerian Chronicles VII- Hospitals

Posted in Africa, Documentary | Photography, Nigeria, Non Profit, Uncategorized, womens reproductive healthcare on October 25th, 2010 by tuschman

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Abortions are illegal in Nigeria; nevertheless, abortions occur and as they happen under non-medical conditions, serious complications are all too frequent. Murtala Mohammed Specialist Hospital (MMSH) is the primary public sector hospital in Kano State and has the largest program for treating women for complications of unsafe abortions. Although the hospital serves mainly woman in Kano, patients from neighboring Nigerian states and countries as far away as Mali and Niger seek treatment here as well. I was informed that due to lack of blood storage facilities, the MMSH is one of only three comprehensive obstetric care facilities in the state able to provide the full range of life saving obstetric services. Trained nurses and midwives treat women suffering from incomplete abortion with manual vacuum aspiration (MVA) in a dedicated procedure room. Care is available 24 hours a day.  Women normally wait only 30 minutes to be treated, and most go home within an hour after treatment, after receiving counseling and choosing a contraceptive method.

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UNICEF-Columbia University- Health Care Workers II

Posted in Documentary | Photography, Non Profit, Recent Projects, Uncategorized on February 9th, 2010 by tuschman

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I was asked to do some hero close-up photos of the health care workers. Here is a selection of some of the “unsung heroes” who tirelessly do the day to day work in providing the only health care for most young mothers- they probably will never be seen by a physician. From the interviews that we did, most health care workers felt overwhelmed- they were understaffed and needed much more support.